Ryan’s Rising

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Ryan Tubridy is none of your Mickey Muds or Paddy Stinks. He was the featured personality on RTÉ’s Ireland’s Rising last night, and while your grandfather and mine were probably digging ditches to put bread on the table, Ryan’s granda was a GP. Going back a further generation, his great-grandfather and great-grandmother were principals of a local school in the west of Ireland. We even saw a very long, newsy letter she’d written to Roger Casement; and we heard how Casement regretted that the Germans had dropped him off on a beach in Kerry, from where he was taken to London and his death. If only they’d dropped him off in Carrowroe, in the west of Ireland, “it’d have been a much more interesting day at the office”, as Ryan put it. (Look, Virginia, that’s how Ryan talks. OK?)

The rest of the programme dealt with the mustering of 500 or more men in the west of Ireland, and their disbanding after a few days, on word that the Sherwood Foresters were on their way.

There are two views on the Easter Rising, Ryan explained. “The first is that it was run by brave men and women, the second that it was run by a bunch of yahoos acting the maggot. I go with the former”.

Should Ryan, should Irish people be proud of what these men and women did a hundred years ago?. After all, they did engage in violence. And isn’t it true that more civilians were killed in the Rising than participants?

Tush pish, according to Ryan. “Take out those medals, dust them off, put them on the wall. And when you look at the tricolour, remember these were good decent men and women, and remember the rightness of the cause they fought for”.

Throughout the programme, Ryan kept talking about “this country” which I assumed was Ireland. But now I’m not so sure. Because we were urged to go to www.ireland’srising/partners, where we would find what Easter Rising-linked events occurred just a century ago in our county. So I went and searched for Tyrone…It wasn’t there. Neither was Antrim. Or Armagh. Or Derry. Or Down. Or Fermanagh. So clearly when Ryan says “our country” and celebrates the violence which led to its creation, he’s talking about the twenty-six counties, not the six. Phew. A relief, that. Wouldn’t want to be linked to a bunch of people who celebrate violence.

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35 Responses to Ryan’s Rising

  1. Jim.hunter December 7, 2015 at 9:04 am #

    Great story jude.

    • Jude Collins December 7, 2015 at 9:05 am #

      Tragic.really.Jim.When.You.Think.About.It.

  2. John Patton December 7, 2015 at 10:57 am #

    Glasgow Council is worried that an SNP motion which seeks to celebrate the 100th .Anniversary will provoke public violence. A Scot played a lead role too

  3. Iolar December 7, 2015 at 11:40 am #

    Roger Casement 1 September 1864 – 3 August 1916 was described as the “Father of twentieth-century Human Rights investigations,” for his work in the Congo and in Peru. Some readers may be interested in the events leading up to the execution of Roger Casement following his arrest at Banna Strand Good Friday 1916. His treatment while in custody in Tralee, courtesy of Inspector John Kearney and his wife, was somewhat different to the treatment he received in London. The details may be found in:

    District Inspector John A Kearney, published by Trafford Books

    • TheHist December 7, 2015 at 3:08 pm #

      Lolar – Roger Casement – an interesting character – The 13 year old orphan, adopted by the Young family (cousins) of Ballymena, who was to attend Ballymena Academy. The aristocratic family, made rich by the linen industry who owned Galgorm Castle! The same Young family who helped set up, equip the local UVF with uniforms and provided finance for weapons to come in via Larne in 1914. George Young or “Orange George” the local commander of the UVF and 9 other districts, whilst his sister was an ardent Gaelic leaguer. Whilst Casement himself was a staunch Nationalist and instrumental to setting up the Irish Volunteers and bringing weapons in via Howth in July 1914 – Brought up in similar surroundings, yet were to prove completely different characters! Fascinating story!

      • Iolar December 7, 2015 at 7:33 pm #

        Grma, John Kearney and his wife would concur with your opinion, as would another interesting character and good friend of John Kearney’s, M Collins Esq.

        • TheHist December 8, 2015 at 4:16 am #

          Indeed – provided some vital information to Collins during the War of Independence – think Michael Collins had asked Kearney, after partition, to establish the civic guards. Kearney’s popularity though was short lived when Austin Stack claimed he had maltreated Casement in 1916 forcing him to forever flee Ireland – due to recrimination. Dev was involved in the slur campaign too. I recall reading somewhere that Stack was given information on Casement, whilst in custody, by Kearney and Stack refused to act on it to rescue him – getting rid of Kearney would rid Ireland of the story …

  4. Pointis December 7, 2015 at 12:36 pm #

    Jude,

    You think that is bad! I remember 30 years ago listening to an RTE Radio 2 presenter attending an Irish festival in Killburn, London describe it as “the 27th County of Ireland”!

  5. Wolfe tone December 7, 2015 at 12:40 pm #

    Tubridy is simply the end product of the counterrevolution that occurred after the war of independence also known as the civil war. The British may have handed over the keys to Dublin castle but they made sure their kind of people got the keys. They were quite adept at ensuring compliant governments were installed in their former colonies. In fact some would say they are still at the same carry on, Syria for example.

  6. TheHist December 7, 2015 at 2:46 pm #

    You are right, Jude. 254 civilians killed during the Rising, 2,217 injured compared with 64 rebels killed and 132 British troops – Yes, it was violence – although in the scheme of things, this increasingly seems to be “acceptable” violence. These “good decent men and women, and the rightness of the cause they fought for” – So does Tubridy support those men and women who carried on the “cause” after the Rising?

    For Tubridy and many others in the South – the Easter Rising was long forgotten and an event that many were often embarrassed about. For many years, successive Fianna Fail, Fine Gael and Labour governments just didn’t abandon celebrating the Rising, they prevented and banned others from doing so. All of a sudden everyone has either someone who fought in the Rising and sentiments expressed by Tubridy and many others seems to be the “new norm.”

  7. neill December 7, 2015 at 3:29 pm #

    Give it over Jude if you want to celebrate what the IRA did over the last 40 years in Northern Ireland go and organise something. As for trying to compare the 1916 rising to the modern day IRA do you think that Connolly and Pearse would have been in favour of car bombs sectarianism disappearing people and gangsterism?

    • Jude Collins December 7, 2015 at 6:55 pm #

      Neill – you’re riding very near the edge. When did I ever celebrate the IRA?

      • neill December 8, 2015 at 11:46 am #

        You are the person comparing Southern Irish attitudes to the 1916 rising and their revulsion of the modern IRA. Why do you have the need to compare them or are you using the 1916 Rising as a fig leaf for the IRA`s activities in Northern Ireland.

        Do you think that Connolly and Pearse would have been in favour of car bombs sectarianism disappearing people and gangsterism?

        I see you didn’t answer this part either!

        • Jude Collins December 8, 2015 at 12:00 pm #

          Well, that’s a fair question, neill – as distinct from accusing me of unsubstantiated wrong-doing.
          Now. Why am I comparing the modern IRA and the violent actions of 1916 and after? Well I think even the most cursory reading of the history of both periods would make it clear that the methods and objectives of both were near-identical. Michael Collins, Tom Barry, Cathal Brugha etc didn’t use car-bombs because there were few cars and that method hadn’t been invented. Disappearing people? Read the history, neill. Sectarianism? Read the history again, neill – esp. of Cork. Gangsterism? You’d have to be more specific. Summing up: there is a hypocrisy attached to people who laud one group of violent men and women and condemn another group of violent men and women who resemble them in substantial ways.

          • neill December 8, 2015 at 12:12 pm #

            That’s a fair answer however it is telling I mentioned Pearse and Connolly and you made no mention of them and you talked about Barry and Brugha whom undoubtedly the modern IRA were very close to in thought and in action yet SF and the IRA always claim to be the true descendants of Pearse and Connolly rather than Barry or Brugha. Wouldn’t have thought Michael Collins would have been to popular with the modern IRA either….

          • Jude Collins December 8, 2015 at 1:52 pm #

            Well fine, Neill – I think there are obvious comparisons between goal and methods of Pearse/Connolly and IRA. Both wanted a united independent Ireland and both used very violent means. I’m baffled that you don’t see the parallel, neill. I’m also baffled as to why you wouldn’t think the modern IRA would have been in synch with M Collins- again, check the history…

          • jessica December 8, 2015 at 1:59 pm #

            “I’m also baffled as to why you wouldn’t think the modern IRA would have been in synch with M Collins”

            He is certainly one of my heroes

            I guess neill is a dev man 🙂

          • billy December 9, 2015 at 12:39 pm #

            would the traitor speech be hypocrisy.

          • Jude Collins December 9, 2015 at 1:33 pm #

            Why not ask him? He’s on Twitter, billy…

      • Raymond December 8, 2015 at 3:50 pm #

        The modern ira should also be celebrated for there commitment to getting rid of British rule in Ireland

        • jessica December 8, 2015 at 7:33 pm #

          We could form a new marching organisation, call it the green circle and get nice green sashes with black beanies, carry swords with sam missile banners and claim a new traditional route up the shankill road.

        • Mitchel December 8, 2015 at 8:33 pm #

          Celebrated or commemorated, Raymond? If celebrated, how should they be celebrated? A party?

          In relation to the IRA – was every “operation” a strike for Irish freedom and to remove British rule in Ireland?

          • jessica December 8, 2015 at 11:13 pm #

            “Celebrated or commemorated, Raymond? If celebrated, how should they be celebrated? A party?
            In relation to the IRA – was every “operation” a strike for Irish freedom and to remove British rule in Ireland?”

            I am sure he meant commemorated Mitchel. Only the orange order actually celebrate historic conflict.

            The UVF declared war on the IRA in 1966, at a time when they were about to stand down. It took 4 years of loyalist aggression, burning homes and nightly shootings which got so bad the Irish army were ordered to the border with orders to get ready to go in and get as many people out safely before the PIRA was born out of desperation.

            PIRA was never anything so glamorous as a strike for Irish freedom. It was fight or flight and they chose to fight and for that I am grateful.

            No one wants conflict and I am glad it is over. But I see no difference in honouring the british army than those who died defending communities in Ireland and in doing so had to take on a global military power.

        • neill December 8, 2015 at 9:09 pm #

          Rewarded for failure?

    • jessica December 7, 2015 at 9:28 pm #

      “Give it over Jude if you want to celebrate what the IRA did over the last 40 years in Northern Ireland go and organise something. As for trying to compare the 1916 rising to the modern day IRA do you think that Connolly and Pearse would have been in favour of car bombs sectarianism disappearing people and gangsterism?”

      Irelands history has unfortunately little to celebrate. The day we achieve full independence will be a day worth celebrating. But we should always commemorate all of the IRA of past century and likewise allow loyalists the freedom to commemorate their own people.

      I don’t believe Connolly or Pearse would have given up the north for anything.

      Perhaps that is something the south should consider when they think about the Irish freedom they take for granted.

  8. Padraig December 7, 2015 at 5:02 pm #

    Why have so many Irish people lost that fire in there belly? It’s all so p.c .

  9. michael c December 7, 2015 at 5:29 pm #

    Turbridy’s grandfather Todd Andrews was not of the “stater” mindset at all.In his later years he wrote a column in the “Irish press ” which was very sympathetic to Northern republicans.Although he was FF he was never fully trusted by the free state establishment,even to the point of being labelled a Soviet sympathiser by some.One of Todd’s sons Niall was supportive of the H block prisoners and a grandson Chris Andrews is a SF councillor.When Niall was a FF MEP he was attacked by British tories for wearing a badge supporting Arthur Scargill and the miners.

  10. Perkin Warbeck December 7, 2015 at 8:43 pm #

    One suspects that if you ever suffered the indignity of being a guest / victim on the Late, Late Show, Esteemed Blogmeister, you might be tempted to react the way Sam Phillips did on the David Letterman Show.

    Sam, aka, ‘The Man who invented Rock ‘n Roll’ in his chimerical Sun Studio at Memphis, Tn., 1956, seemed bored out of his Southern skull and at one stage, leaned forward to enquire of his host, in his lumbering Tennessee drawl: ‘Say, Mr. Letterman, how come with teeth as bad as yours, y’all became such a success?’.

    One suspects that in the case of Ryan Tubridy it might be more a case of the mentals rather than the dentals. For, in truth, and it gives one no pleasure at all to say this, but every year the gap between the two Morris Minor-indicator ears of Tubs seems to be a, erm, gap year, year on year.

    The two most popular attractions in the award-winning Singapore Zoo are, in no particular order, the white tigers and the proboscis monkeys. One of the unfortunate keepers had made a full Singaporean breakfast for one of the white tigers (though it was suggested it may have been a one-sided suicide pact) the week before Perkie paid a visit there, some five or six years ago.

    And so, one avoided the first attraction and concentrated on the second.

    Now, coincidentally, the proboscis monkey is endemic to the south east Asian island of Borneo much the same way the proboscis Andrews clan is endemic to the south east coastal area of Dublin. Think David Andrews, Niall Andrews and a veritable swarm of younger political Andrews, all descended from the legendary Todd Andrews whom everybody of a certain vintage knows possessed a schnozz worthy of the jovial J. Durante, Esq., himself.

    For those of lesser vintage Perkie’s inner distinguished historian, Perkin Sebag Warbeck , PhD, can inform them that Todd Andrews’s other main claim to enduring fame was his part in the Great Irish Train Robbery.

    Now, what differentiated Todd A. from his counterparts across the Irish Channel, was not so much the flat boxer noses of Buster Edwards, Ronnie Biggs and even Patrick McKenna, aka, (gulp) The Ulsterman, as their modus operandi.

    Whereas the Great Train Robbers (alleged) merely stole FROM a train (and only one at that) Todd Andrews actually STOLE trains, hundreds of them. This he achieved in a short number of years back in the years when Sam Phillips was building up his rock and rolling stock (see above) by CLOSING down scores of railway lines, hither, tither and yon, not only focusing on the narrow-gauge variety either.

    That was in his capacity as FF-appoInted Chairman of CIE.

    Next time one gets stuck on the lateral M1 carpark, of a wet, miserable Friday evening, thank Todd for the blessing.

    Now, Todd was Tubs’s maternal grandfather and to the (gulp) naked eye it is obvious that he inherited both the nose and the narrow-gauge physique. This very narrowness might well go a ways to explain the sheer unfathomable shallowness of the Ryan, erm, mind.

    Innumerable trains of thoughts have been summarily shut down there or thereabouts.

    One hastens to mention, incidentally, that the reference to the proboscis monkey (see above) was solely for the p-word. As monkeys are usually bracketed with nuts in the salary bench-mark rankings, the very last thing one associates with Tubs (as an inappropriate nomenclature it is right in there with Barney Curley) is/are nuts.

    According to the Wise Old Man Wikipedia, aka Wickers, one Ryan Tubridy earned (RTe) 720,000 smackerooneys in 2011. Now, there are those begrudgers out there who will take umbrage at this reported figure, going backward. Even unto the walking out of their TV rooms in, erm, high dudgeon.

    Perkie is not one of them; old money from the centuries old Warbeckian coffers sees to that. Which is not to say he is not taking umbrage in a high dudgeonesque way. It is his inner lexicographer what is very, very vexed indeed.

    Earned?

    When will old Wickers ever learn, when will he ever learn?

  11. Croiteir (@Croiteir) December 8, 2015 at 2:59 am #

    Bet you don’t know he is a descendant from English royalty? We all have our burdens.

    • Mitchel December 8, 2015 at 10:49 am #

      Says it all then

  12. neill December 8, 2015 at 5:44 pm #

    I’m also baffled as to why you wouldn’t think the modern IRA would have been in synch with M Collins- again, check the history

    Oh they might have loved the man who fought against the British Army but the man who signed the treaty which created Northern Ireland the man who fought against the anti treaty IRA etc…?

    Well fine, Neill – I think there are obvious comparisons between goal and methods of Pearse/Connolly and IRA. Both wanted a united independent Ireland and both used very violent means. I’m baffled that you don’t see the parallel, neill.

    I am very sure Connolly and Pearse would not have wanted bombs going off in town centres killing people or killing people and disappearing them that’s why they might hve approved of the aims but certainly not the method.

    • Jude Collins December 8, 2015 at 6:40 pm #

      I think guessing what the dead would have thought of 100 years later is something that’s very tricky – the word ‘certainly’ certainly doesn’t feature…

    • TheHist December 8, 2015 at 8:44 pm #

      For your information, Neill, and in the interests of historical accuracy, the Anglo Irish Treaty as signed by Collins and the Irish delegation did not create Northern Ireland. Northern Ireland was created by the Government of Ireland Act, 1920. The Anglo Irish Treaty created Ireland as a Free State as a dominion of the Commonwealth. If you know anything about this period, you will clearly be aware of the duress Lloyd George put on the Irish delegation to sign the Treaty and the manipulation of Arthur Griffiths. Collins, famously stated after signing the Treaty that “I have signed my own death warrant,” fully aware of the implications. Did he have a choice? Immediate War on Ireland or sign the Treaty that offered more than Home Rule was ever going to offer?

      To state what Connolly and Pearse may or may not have done is silly, if not stupid.

      • neill December 9, 2015 at 7:08 am #

        Government of Ireland act may have created Northern Ireland but the genesis of Northern Ireland comes from the treaty even if you don’t like that fact

  13. TheHist December 9, 2015 at 10:08 am #

    “Government of Ireland act may have created Northern Ireland.” No Neill, DID CREATE Northern Ireland. That is the FACT.