November, 2018

The DUP: slowly and painfully, the truth sinks in

Imagine a very sharp-posted picket fence. Now imagine a very fat man sitting on that fence.  You should at this point have a fairly good idea of how the DUP are feeling. “We had to do something to show our displeasure”  Sammy Wilson told the BBC’s Newsnight. What was that something? His party had abstained from […]

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TWO POLITICAL LETTERS by Donal Kennedy

  Letter in The Irish Times   28 December 2005 1916 Rising and the First World War Madam Kevin Myers is to be thanked for bringing to our attention the fact that 800 men from Co. Louth died in the 1914-1918 War (An Irishman’s Diary, December 20th). Louth is only  one of 32 counties, and not […]

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On being in the right place at the right time

The man or the moment – or the woman or the moment, for that matter? Which is it? Is it the talent and strength of character of the individual political leader who bends events into the shape and direction they have chosen, or is it that the time for these events has come, and the […]

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How To Alienate Your Base

It was like watching a trusted mastiff suddenly turn  and bite its owner in the bum. Or a dead sheep being slowly turned on the spit. Totally unexpected, painful and yet hilarious. I’m referring, of course, to The View on TV the other night. The good knight Sir Jeffrey spend what seemed like years trying to […]

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Crystal balls and post-Brexit: an inexact science?

The indicators against a hard Brexit are becoming more obvious by the day. Here in our Tormented Green Corner (TGC) the Ulster Farmers Union and the business community have made it clear they want the deal Theresa May has cobbled together. Are they right? Because it can be argued that predictions of Brexit disaster may […]

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AMNESIA — OFFICIAL! by Donal Kennedy

   “The Month of November used be one of solemn Remembrance in Ireland. For Dublin Brigade Volunteer and Medical Student Kevin Barry, hanged by the British in 1920.  For Tipperary footballer  Michael Hogan and twelve spectators killed at Croke Park by British rifle fire. For Brigadier Dick McKee, Vice-Brigadier Peadar Clancy and the civilian Conor […]

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