THE SUNDAY TIMES (LONDON) ALLEGES BRITISH FORCES’ ATROCITIES IN AFGHANISTAN AND IRAQ AND CONDEMNS THEIR COVER UP BY SENIOR OFFICERS AND GOVERNMENT MINISTERS by Donal Kennedy

The British edition of the Sunday Times (17 November 2019) devotes two Broadsheet pages plus much of its front page plus an Editorial. which, if true, should bury the forces concerned, their political directors and media abettors in infamy. In the 1940s some Nazis and their collaborators, guilty of similar crimes were, deservedly, hanged, albeit by their conquerors. 

The paper reports that  its revelations could result in a War Crimes investigation  of British  forces by the International Criminal Court, which is obliged to act when countries fail to hold military forces to account for breaches of the Geneva conventions. Those conventions are not applicable where the Criminals label wars as “Emergencies” and do not result in heavy insurance premiums where the criminals have goldmines, tin mines, rubber and tea mines. Britain has waged many murderous campaigns, labelling them Emergencies to its undeserved profit.

“Evidence implicating  British soldiers in the murder of children and  the torture of civilians was covered up by military commanders, according to leaked documents that had been kept secret by  the government.”

The detailed allegations are not about mistakes made in the heat of armed engagements or immediate reprisals carried out by excited inexperienced young men.They depict highly trained SAS soldiers cold-bloodedly murdering children who were sitting having tea in their own home, and the prolonged torture of prisoners, some of them men forced to bugger and fellate each other by members of the Black Watch Regiment.

Of course’ readers from Ballymurphy, Derry and other happy recipients of the protection given them by the British Army and its collaborators, will be surprised, appalled, and unconvinced by the allegations in The Sunday Times, and will continue to wear their Poppies with Gratitude and Pride?

By the way, on 23 November 1920, when Joe Devlin, MP for Belfast West, asked the Secretary of State for Ireland, to say who was responsible for the recent murder of Father Griffin in County Galway, (notoriously killed by Crown Forces), Winston Churchill was heard to prompt the Secretary – “Say Sinn Feiners”

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